Is Bartering the way forward?

We have been conditioned to believe that we have to rely upon banks to store and provide money for our needs yet the systems that exist now have only been available to the majority of people for little over 50 years.
Banks themselves and financiers (not Government I may add).

Just think about who (The Government) they borrow money from. Is there a country without debt? Look at this list taken from Wiki.
Rumor has it there will be a cashless society, maybe a stamp upon your person that determines how much you are allowed to spend? It is plain to see by this list below that no country actually has any real “Money” Has it ever been real?

Rank Country External debt[2]
US dollars
Date Per capita[3][4][5][6]
US dollars
% of GDP[7][8][9]
 European Union 16,080,000,000,000 30 June 2011 27,864 85
1  United States 16,506,210,900,000 5 Feb 2013 52,170 105
3  France 5,633,000,000,000 30 June 2011 74,619 182
4  Germany 5,624,000,000,000 30 June 2011 57,755 142
5  Japan 2,719,000,000,000 30 June 2011 19,148 45
8  Italy 2,460,000,000,000 30 June 2012 est. 36,841 108
6  Netherlands 2,655,489,600,000 30 June 2011 226,503 344
7  Spain 2,570,000,000,000 30 June 2011 18,260 84
9  Ireland 2,352,000,000,000 30 September 2011 26,820 108.2
10  Luxembourg[note 1] 2,146,000,000,000 30 June 2011 3,696,467 3,443
12  Belgium 1,399,000,000,000 30 June 2011 113,603 266
11  Australia 1,466,000,000,000 31 December 2012est. 52,596 95
13  Switzerland 1,346,000,000,000 30 June 2011 154,063 229
14  Canada 1,181,000,000,000 30 June 2011 est. 29,625 64
15  Sweden 1,016,000,000,000 30 June 2011 91,487 187
2  United Kingdom 9,836,000,000,000 30 June 2011 156,126 390
 Hong Kong 903,200,000,000 31 June 2011 est. 105,420 334
16  Austria 883,500,000,000 30 June 2011 90,128 200
17  China 710,700,000,000 31 December 2012 est. 396 8.7
18  Norway 644,500,000,000 30 June 2011 131,220 141
19  Denmark 626,900,000,000 30 June 2011 101,084 180
20  Greece 583,300,000,000 30 June 2011 47,636 174
22  Portugal 548,800,000,000 30 June 2011 47,835 223
24  Russia 455,200,000,000 31 December 2012 3,634 23
21  Finland 577,700,000,000 31 December 2011 68,960 155
25  Korea, South 436,900,000,000 31 December 2012est. 7,567 37
26  Brazil 405,300,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,608 15
27  Turkey 331,400,000,000 31 December 2012est. 3,794 40
29  India 299,200,000,000 31 December 2012 237 21
28  Poland 310,200,000,000 31 December 2012est. 6,639 54
30  Mexico 217,700,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,956 20
31  Indonesia 187,100,000,000 31 December 2012est. 837 28
38  Romania 125,900,000,000 31 December 2012est. 5,082 67
32  Hungary 170,000,000,000 31 December 2012est. 14,821 115
33  United Arab Emirates 158,900,000,000 31 December 2012est. 24,273 41
40  Iceland[10][11] 116,053,000,000 2008 362,942 999
35  Argentina 130,200,000,000 30 September 2012est. 3,176 27
39  Ukraine 124,900,000,000 31 December 2012est. 2,144 71
45  Chile 102,100,000,000 31 December 2012est. 5,867 38
43  Kazakhstan 105,500,000,000 31 December 2012est. 6,060 68
44  Israel 104,200,000,000 31 December 2012est. 12,070 42
48  Czech Republic 90,180,000,000 2012 est. 8,260 45
36  Saudi Arabia 127,400,000,000 31 December 2012est. 3,176 19
41  Thailand 115,600,000,000 30 September 2011est. 1,292 26
57  South Africa 47,560,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,613 23
46  Malaysia 95,550,000,000 31 December 2012est. 2,570 31
34  Qatar 137,000,000,000 31 December 2012est. 41,988 55
51  Philippines 68,390,000,000 30 December 2012est. 636 32
52  Croatia 64,250,000,000 31 December 2012est. 13,519 99
50  Slovakia 72,940,000,000 30 November 2011est. 10,926 68
49  Colombia 73,410,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,269 20
55  Pakistan 55,980,000,000 31 December 2012est. 343 33
69  Kuwait 28,210,000,000 31 December 2012est. 15,754 43
53  Venezuela 63,740,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,906 19
23  Iraq 50,268,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,641 64
54  Slovenia 61,230,000,000 30 June 2011 25,555 47.6
58  Bulgaria 43,240,000,000 31 December 2012est. 6,261 90
63  Latvia 35,340,000,000 31 December 2012 18,527 146
60  Sudan 39,700,000,000 31 December 2012est. 946 55
65  Lebanon 32,640,000,000 31 December 2012est. 8,815 88
59  Vietnam 41,850,000,000 31 December 2012est. 379 32
61  Peru 38,910,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,126 22
42  Cyprus 106,500,000,000 31 December 2011est. 37,812 129
67  Lithuania 31,370,000,000 31 December 2012 9,995 80
66  Serbia 32,600,000,000 31 December 2012est. 4,178 80
64  Egypt 34,880,000,000 31 December 2012est. 391 14
151  Belarus 1,067,000,000 31 December 2012est. 2,629 45
62  Bangladesh 36,210,000,000 31 December 2012est. 149 23
68  Morocco 29,420,000,000 31 December 2012est. 712 22
72  Singapore 24,640,000,000 31 December 2012est. 4,194 10
70  Estonia 25,920,000,000 31 December 2012 15,405 98
75  Cuba 22,360,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,780 34
73  Tunisia 24,490,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,779 42
77  Angola 19,650,000,000 31 December 2012est. 944 21
74  Sri Lanka 22,820,000,000 31 December 2012est. 881 36
81  Guatemala 16,170,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,216 42
80  Monaco[note 2] 16,500,000,000 31 June 2010 est. 471,428 240
76  Ecuador 20,030,000,000 31 December 2012est. 995 25
71  Bahrain 25,270,000,000 31 December 2012est. 13,261 65
83  Panama 13,130,000,000 31 December 2012est. 3,927 52
100  Congo, Democratic Republic of the 7,644,000,000 31 December 2012est. 197 122
87  Uruguay 11,610,000,000 31 December 2012est. 3,989 33
79  Dominican Republic 16,580,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,162 25
95  Iran 9,452,000,000 31 December 2012est. 170 4
82  Jamaica 14,600,000,000 31 December 2012est. 4,660 92
85  Korea, North 12,500,000,000 2001 est. 544 N/A
120  Cote d’Ivoire 4,742,000,000 31 December 2012est. 527 51
84  El Salvador 12,840,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,953 53
91  Nigeria 10,100,000,000 31 December 2012est. 71 5
99  Georgia 8,200,000,000 31 December 2012 2,424 77
93  Oman 9,768,000,000 31 December 2012est. 2,962 16
86  Costa Rica 12,040,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,874 24
96  Bosnia and Herzegovina 9,051,000,000 31 December 2012est. 2,052 48
94  Kenya 9,526,000,000 31 December 2012est. 200 25
97  Syria 8,818,000,000 31 December 2012est. 373 13
102  Zimbabwe 6,975,000,000 31 December 2012est. 609 103
89  Tanzania 11,180,000,000 31 December 2012est. 183 33
104  Yemen 6,726,000,000 31 December 2012est. 293 23
109  Burma 5,448,000,000 31 December 2012est. 117 17
88  Ghana 11,230,000,000 31 December 2012est. 274 21
115  Libya 5,054,000,000 31 December 2012est. 972 9
56  Malta 48,790,000,000 30 June 2011 14,233 72
108  Laos 5,599,000,000 31 December 2012est. 900 91
98  Jordan 8,345,000,000 31 December 2012est. 903 20
103  Republic of Macedonia 6,740,000,000 31 December 2012est. 2,668 60
105  Armenia 6,435,000,000 31 December 2012 1,584 56
130  Mauritius 2,942,000,000 31 December 2012est. 3,937 52
168  Turkmenistan 429,100,000 31 December 2012est. 978 25
101  Congo, Republic of the 7,644,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,722 155
117  Mozambique 4,880,000,000 31 December 2012est. 231 50
113  Moldova 5,167,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,296 79
127  Nepal 3,774,000,000 31 December 2011 161 35
114  Cambodia 5,071,000,000 31 December 2012est. 304 37
119  Trinidad and Tobago 4,780,000,000 31 December 2012est. 3,502 21
92  Ethiopia 9,956,000,000 31 December 2012est. 51 14
90  Uzbekistan 10,460,000,000 31 December 2012est. 150 11
122  Algeria 4,344,000,000 31 December 2012est. 115 3
112  Nicaragua 5,228,000,000 31 December 2012est. 693 62
125  Senegal 4,117,000,000 31 December 2012est. 296 30
128  Kyrgyzstan 3,666,000,000 31 December 2012 699 81
116  Honduras 4,884,000,000 31 December 2012est. 465 23
110  Zambia 5,445,000,000 31 December 2012est. 264 22
129  Cameroon 3,343,000,000 31 December 2012est. 164 15
126  Azerbaijan 4,042,000,000 31 December 2012est. 8,513 6
135  Guinea 2,652,000,000 31 December 2012est. 305 68
130  Somalia 2,942,000,000 31 December 2010est. 386 N/A
136  Madagascar 2,631,000,000 31 December 2012est. 140 36
154  Benin 953,500,000 31 December 2012est. 308 43
124  Uganda 4,126,000,000 31 December 2012est. 85 17
107  Bolivia 5,604,000,000 31 December 2012est. 275 15
111  Albania 5,281,000,000 31 December 2012 882 23
134  Mali 2,725,000,000 31 December 2012 254 88
144  Afghanistan 1,280,000,000 FY10/11 92 22
106  Paraguay 5,714,000,000 31 December 2012est. 382 13
133  Gabon 2,758,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,587 18
123  Namibia 4,204,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,131 20
139  Botswana 1,968,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,208 16
143  Niger 1,451,000,000 31 December 2012est. 178 79
137  Burkina Faso 2,442,000,000 31 December 2012est. 136 23
132  Tajikistan 2,771,000,000 31 December 2012est. 262 35
138  Mongolia 2,070,000,000 31 December 2011 686 41
140  Chad 1,749,000,000 31 December 2012est. 160 21
156  Sierra Leone 827,600,000 31 December 2012est. 340 61
118  Papua New Guinea 4,860,000,000 31 December 2012est. 238 16
142  Seychelles 1,453,000,000 31 December 2012est. 15,614 147
148  Malawi 1,214,000,000 31 December 2012est. 77 24
176  Burundi 231,700,000 31 December 2012 167 202
166  Central African Republic 469,500,000 31 December 2012est. 270 68
 West Bank 1,040,000,000 2010 est. 414 N/A
141  Belize 1,457,000,000 31 December 2012est. 3,079 75
152  Eritrea 1,026,000,000 31 December 2012est. 195 58
153  Maldives 1,015,000,000 2011 est. 2,947 50
150  Guinea-Bissau 1,095,000,000 31 December 2010est. 722 259
145  Bhutan 1,275,000,000 2011 1,193 64
147  Equatorial Guinea 1,232,000,000 31 December 2012est. 634 6
146  Guyana 1,234,000,000 31 December 2010 1,049 42
121  Barbados 4,490,000,000 2010 est. 2,456 22
149  Montenegro 1,200,000,000 2011 est. 939 24
160  Lesotho 715,400,000 31 December 2012est. 255 30
161  Gambia, The 545,800,000 31 December 2012est. 306 50
163  Suriname 504,300,000 2005 est. 1,011 28
159  Swaziland 737,300,000 31 December 2012est. 428 14
174  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 252,200,000 31 December 2012est. 4,477 85
 Aruba 478,600,000 2005 est. 4,935 21
157  Djibouti 802,900,000 31 December 2012est. 573 56
167  Antigua and Barbuda 458,000,000 June 2010 4,388 36
155  Haiti 854,700,000 31 December 2012est. 36 5
162  Grenada 538,000,000 2010 est. 3,402 74
78  Bahamas, The 16,680,000,000 31 December 2012est. 1,067 6
158  Cape Verde 741,300,000 31 December 2012est. 714 52
170  Sao Tome and Principe 316,600,000 31 December 2012est. 2,193 349
177  Saint Kitts and Nevis 189,100,000 31 December 2012est. 6,408 79
165  Saint Lucia 471,400,000 31 December 2012est. 1,586 32
169  Liberia 400,300,000 31 December 2012[12] 65 22
47  New Zealand 90,230,000,000 31 December 2012est. 52,300 126
164  Comoros 485,400,000 31 December 2010est. 430 115
173  Dominica 253,800,000 31 December 2012est. 3,000 75
175  Samoa 235,500,000 31 December 2009est. 968 47
178  Solomon Islands 166,000,000 2004 355 44
 Bermuda 160,000,000 FY99/00 2,575 5
179  Cook Islands 141,000,000 1996 est. 7,756 N/A
172  Fiji 268,000,000 31 December 2012est. 150 5
181  Marshall Islands 87,000,000 2008 est. 1,377 54
171  Vanuatu 307,700,000 31 December 2012est. 389 22
180  Tonga 118,600,000 31 December 2012est. 799 33
 New Caledonia 79,000,000 1998 est. 385 3
 Cayman Islands 79,000,000 1998 est. 2,078 7
 Faroe Islands 888,800,000 2010 N/A N/A
182  Micronesia, Federated States of 60,800,000 FY05 est. 556 25
 Greenland 36,400,000 2010 1,035 5
 British Virgin Islands 0 2012 N/A N/A
183  Nauru 33,300,000 2004 est. N/A N/A
184  Kiribati 10,000,000 1999 est. 120 14
 Montserrat 8,900,000 1997 N/A N/A
 Anguilla 8,800,000 1998 N/A N/A
 Wallis and Futuna 3,670,000 2004 N/A N/A
185  Niue 418,000 2002 est. N/A N/A
 Macau 0 2010 0 0
37  Taiwan 127,400,000,000 31 December 2012est. 0 0
186  Liechtenstein 0 2011 0 0
186  Brunei 0 2005 0 0
186  Palau

It may look like there is actually some special entity that provides cash resources to the world, in fact it is an illusion based on the continual swapping or bartering that goes on amongst countries and the actual paper money is just a note of credit. Even gold precious as it is regarded is actually worthless. Looks nice but you can’t eat it nor use it for any useful purpose other than adornment or in specialized industrial or medical uses.

It is no surprise therefore that Corporations have been buying land and producing GMO crops and animals. This is the only true form of wealth. Most of the land is taken by the local aristocracy any how. They gained this precious commodity via theft or war from the indigenous peoples of the lands. (You the person are indigenous no matter what your race if you are born in a particular land.)

It is the populace that uses creativity and skill to make the things we need or want not the financiers . In an other world will would be able to co operate to produce a pleasant life for all as long as we are collectively willing to lose the more brutish aspects of our systems. That is the main sticking point, with regards to progressing, as a total race of humans.

Bartering is something that can be done in local communities and extended out.

Bartering is growing in popularity today with consumers and businesses realizing that it’s a great way to budget and a creative way to lower expenses. It certainly isn’t something new; bartering has been around for a very long time. It’s the way our ancestors conducted their daily business and how they survived.

If this isn’t something new to you, then you understand that bartering is an economical and clever way to save money. If you’re relatively new to bartering and you’d like to learn more, then that is the exact reason to keep reading.

Over the years I’ve learned that many people are unsure as to what exactly, barter means. If in conversation I mentioned the word “barter”, I seemed to get a look of confusion in return. If I mentioned the word “trade” then ah…yes, they knew exactly what I was talking about.

We’ve been bartering ever since we were children and may not even realize it. Remember trading lunches as a child? Unless one of your parents was a famous chef, we all did it. Trading alleys occurred about every other day, and how about the most famous trade deal of all, “If you don’t tell, I’ll give you something”.

Although we weren’t aware of this at the time, our parents bartered with us on a daily basis. You could have dessert, but only if you ate all your vegetables. If you did well on your test, you could get that new shiny red bike. Our children today do the same; only it’s gone from trading alleys, to trading those popular cards.

We didn’t really have a choice but to barter when we were children, we didn’t have the money to buy new things all the time. Children certainly have a way of figuring things out when they want something badly enough. So why does this stop when we become adults? We still have wants and needs but seem to set them aside or continue to spend money when we really don’t have to.

By educating ourselves on the right way to barter, we open ourselves up to many resources and possibilities. It’s a way of taking care of our needs and at the same time someone else’s without spending money. This is done simply by offering our professional services or items we no longer need, in return for what we do.

Everyone has a unique style and personality so as you continue to explore the world of bartering you will find the right way of doing it for yourself. The following chapters are some guidelines to help get you on your way to some successful trades. (http://www.u-exchange.com/barter-system)

Bartering is something that can be done in local communities and extended out. Waste land around the community can be turned into productive food sources. Most of us are used to walking through public places such as parks, villages, towns etc and seeing flower beds and borders that the local authorities have put in place to improve the appearance of the area. These usually consist of either shrubs, shrubs combined with flowers or just annual flowering bedding plants. Every year the annual flowers are replaced with new ones to create another colourful display. Of course the effect is very nice, and few if any would complain at seeing such a bright and cheerful ‘public garden’, but what if there was an even better idea……… what if you were to replace a large amount of those flowers with vegetables and then encourage the local residents to simply help themselves to any they needed whenever they wanted to? http://mistyhorizon2003.hubpages.com/hub/Grow-vegetables-in-villages-towns-cities-parks-and-public-places-instead-of-flowers-free-food-for-all

These systems are ancient methods of sustaining a community yet the basics are there to be adapted to modern methods. We will have to give up certain attitudes, such as considering ourselves to be less or more worthy than another. using brutal  means to get our own way and coercing others to adapt to our will. These things have led us into the waste land we now occupy.

Look at things with a fresh eye and a open heart a great future awaits if we throw away the illusions and delusions that condemn a great portion of humanity into misery and want.

To be continued:

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